"Look at Me My Fawn, Look," Yehuda HaLevi

 

בי הצבי, בי אדני

Original Text:

"בי הצבי בי אדני
יקר בעינך יגוני
פן יקרני אסוני
אט אט אט בדמי כי רק בידך שלומי

ירק לבבך לנדכה
יצום לזעמך ויבכה
ולמן רצונך יחכה
מן מן מן לצומי ותנה שכרי ביומי

אם תעלז על חליי
אשטח לך את לחיי
ותענני וחיי
אין אין אין בחרמי רק ההרוגים לתמי

אריב בנפשי לכילי
לו יפחדני ואלי
ישיב שנתי ואולי
עף עף עף בנומי אבא בכפל חלומי

אם אשאלה צוף שפתו
יאדים כשמש בצאתו
עד אחזה מדמותו
איך איך יאך ארמי יהפך שפתו אדמי

שירו יפלח כבדי
ישיר לעורר יקודי
שק פי ורב לך ידידי
כס כס כס בפמי ודע סואדך יא עמי"

Translation:

"Look at me, my fawn, look!
Take full note of my misery
lest I fill with sorrow . . .
Drip, drip, drip goes my blood,
my life in your hands.

Let your heart be compassionate to the downcast,
who cannot eat and cries when you rage
and waits for your love to return . . .
Manna, manna, manna for my hunger,
give my daily wage.

If you rejoice in my lovesickness,
so here are my cheeks,
abuse me then, afflict me . . .
No, no, no disgrace,
just the casualties of innocence.

I have fought this miser of the heart,
and were he only to fear me
he would return my sleep
and I would . . .
Fly, fly, fly in my slumber,
I would dream double.

I would ask for his honeycomb lips,
reddening like the setting sun
my eyes transfixed on his form . . .
How, how, how does this man from Aram
color his lips so ruddy?

His song ploughs through my body,
he sings to awaken my fire.
Enough, my love, drink from my mouth.
Kiss, kiss, kiss my mouth,
Put aside your black mood, my friend."
[Translation by Rabbi Steven Greenberg]

Suggested Discussion Questions:

1. Rabbi Yehudah HaLevi is the author of the Kuzari and was a religious writer and thinker. Do you find this poem of his surprising? I what way? What can you deduce about the author's attitude towards homosexuality?
2. What do you find most beautiful, painful, troubling and encouraging about this poem?

Time Period:
Type:
Categories:
Keywords:
Related Texts:

Comments on this Text

For relevant context, see Greenberg, Steven, Wrestling With God & Men, 116-117.